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Bad back? (not bad luck)

Coalition PerformancenewsBad back? (not bad luck)

Mar

14

March 14 , 2016 | Posted by Dave Cripps |

Bad back? (not bad luck)

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Currently with a new born, Mrs CP is having back problems

In fact locked up backs, spasms and slipped discs are as common as 90’s dance music in the CP gym, Solihull

 

3 years ago one pro rugby player I physically developed called Tom Youngs had a herniated disc

This meant the gooey fluid in between his vertebrae was oozing out and pressing on a nerve

This created un imaginable pain and frustration

(Particularly if you running into people for a living)

 

So what did I do with Tom which you need to, to stop these back problems kicking in

 

  1. Cause vs. Prevention

 

Its all well and good going to the osteo and having pain killers

But guess what?

 

In most situations the stress on your body which caused the problem will return, yet you’ve done nothing to prevent this from happening again

 

Figure out the cause/activity and what physical qualities will stop this causing the problem

 

E.g. if your back problems occur from long periods seated, what physical improvements will limit this?

 

If your problems kick in when you run, what improvements in your body will prevent this?

 

Below are the most common fixes…

 

  1. Stretch with focus, not in general

 

Often people have a bad back and just take up yoga to stretch…

That’s not specific enough my friend!

 

Your mobility needs focus and typically on the quadriceps, hip flexors and thoracic spine

 

In fact stretching certain areas can make things worse as certain tightness acts to protect your spine

My back is worse in fact if I stretch my hamstrings!

 

  1. Don’t just ‘do some core’

 

First thing you’re told after a bad back?

‘Do some core’

That’s as focused as telling your child who’s failed a maths exam to ‘do some fractions’

 

Your core needs to be trained like any other muscle in relation to being progressively overloaded

HOWEVER, once again, use exercises which stop movement (not sit ups, crunches)

 

Overload by challenging yourself with appropriate loading, not just holding a plank for 60 seconds for ‘a bit of a burn’

 

One of the most common positive outcomes of quality strength and fitness training is massive improvements in these types of pains, from backs to hips

 

Train smart not dumb

 

Speak shortly

Dave ‘hammys as tight as my guitar strings’ Cripps

***Receive FREE, our UNSTOPPABLE RESULTS Training Blueprint E-book, to learn the REAL, PROVEN, KEY methods to achieve the BODY and FITNESS you want <Click HERE>***